Pages

Sunday, September 7, 2008

The Heblish-English Dictionary

Helloooo, Our Shiputzim fans!

Those of us raising kids here in Israel are very familiar with that obscure yet utterly charming language known as “Heblish”.

One of the most fascinating aspects of this particular language is its vast number of dialects. In fact, every American-Israeli household boasts its own unique version.

Therefore, as a public service, I am pleased to announce the upcoming release of the First Edition of the Our Shiputzim Heblish-English Dictionary.

Here are some sample entries:

I’m in metach: Hebrew source – אני במתח . English definition - I’m in suspense. Common usage - “I can’t go to sleep right now. I only have two more chapters left of this book, and I’m in metach.”

I had a mazal: Hebrew source – היה לי מזל. English definition – I was lucky. Common usage - “I know I left for school twenty minutes late this morning. But I had a mazal; the teacher came even later than me!”

The that: Hebrew source – הזה. English definition – That thing or the thingamajig. Common usage - “I put the book down on the that.”

To marry with: Hebrew source – להתחתן עם. English definition – To marry. Common usage - “He is going to marry with her.”

To livater: Hebrew source – לוותר. English definition – To give in; to concede. Common usage - “Fine, he can go first; I’m willing to livater.” (Note: This phrase – like many other infinitives – is often “conjugated.” For example, in the past tense, one would say, “I livater’ed.” Similarly, in future tense, one would say, “I will livater.”)

Feel free to share some of your own examples in the comment section.

11 comments:

  1. what about i will save on him/it for you. from the hebrew אני אשמר

    ReplyDelete
  2. Ok, now you know why you've gotten so many hits on your blog lately. It's because you've stopped talking about drywall and become actually interesting! Am I allowed to comment even though Im not an official family member? One of my favorites has to be the time my son asked if we could "invite a pizza for dinner."

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hi, Malke! Thanks for commenting.

    It's because you've stopped talking about drywall and become actually interesting!
    I'll assume that this is a compliment?
    :-)

    Am I allowed to comment even though Im not an official family member?
    Of course. (And besides, you ARE family!)

    "invite a pizza for dinner."
    This is classic!

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm an American who was married to an Israeli, so we spoke Heblish also Some of my favorites:
    "I'm going to do kniyot".
    "It's better to have a small head" (from rosh katan, to be unassuming and humble).
    "Eizeh motek you are!"

    ReplyDelete
  5. Superraizy - Those are great. I like the "small head" one in particular. Only a Hebrew speaker would have any idea what it means!

    ReplyDelete
  6. Like anonymous, our kids often ask, "If you're going out with Abba, who will keep on us?"

    More often, concerning cards and stickers, it's, "Will you lehahlif me with that?" Or something.

    ReplyDelete
  7. A Living Nadneyda - Your "lehahlif me" example reminds me of yet another one of my kids' awkward Hebrew->English translations. I'll have to remember to include it in my upcoming follow-up to this post.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I enjoyed these. Whenever my cousin, who was born in America but has lived in Israel for almost 40 years, comes to visit he is always searching for the English term to say something or another.

    Loved the translation of thingamajig as ha-zeh, and then the subsequent usage in English.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Loved the translation of thingamajig as ha-zeh, and then the subsequent usage in English.
    My kids say "the that" so often that it's almost starting to sound correct to me...
    :-)

    ReplyDelete
  10. FYI - I just posted an update to this post here.

    Gmar chatimah tovah to all!

    ReplyDelete

Feel free to leave a comment.